Present Perfect Continuous

Present Perfect Continuous tense

We use present perfect progressive tense to show a continued or ongoing action that started in past and still continued in present. There will be a time reference, such as “since 1980, for three hours etc” from which the action has been started. A sense of time reference is found in these sentences which gives an idea that action has been continued from some time in past till now. Such time reference or sense of time reference is the identity of present perfect continuous tense because it tells that action has started from a particular time in past. For example, “He has been studying in this school since 2005”, so the it means that he has started his education in this school in 2005 and he is studying in this school till now.

Rules: An auxiliary verb “has been or have been” is used in sentence. 1st form of verb (base verb) +ing (present participle) is used as main verb in sentence. “Since” or “for” is used before the “time reference” in sentence. If the time reference is exactly known such as 1995, 4 O’clock, “since” is used before the time in sentence. If the timere ference is not exactly known such as three hours, six years, four days, then “for” is used before the time in sentence. Time reference such as 3 hours or 5 days is not exactly known because we don’t know that about which three hours a day is told in sentence or about which 5 days in a month is told in sentence. While the 1995 is exactly known time.

Structure of sentence

Positive Sentence
• Subject + has been/have been + (1st form of the verb + ing) + object +  time reference

If the subject is “He, She, It, singular or proper name”, auxiliary verb “has been” is used after subject in sentence.
If subject is “You, They, We or plural”, auxiliary verb “have been” is used after subject in sentence.
Examples:
        He has been watching movie for two hours.
        The teacher has been punishing students since morning.

Negative Sentence
• Subject + has not been/have not been (hasn't or haven't been)+ (1st form of the verb + ing) + object + time reference
Examples:
        He hasn't been watching movies for two hours.
        The teacher hasn't been punishing students since morning.

Interrogative Sentence
• Has / have + Subject + been + (1st form of the verb + ing) + object + time reference

Interrogative sentence starts with auxiliary verb. If the subject is “He, She, It, singular or proper name” , the sentence starts with auxiliary verb “has” and auxiliary verb “been” is used after subject
If subject is “You, They, We or plural”, the sentence starts with auxiliary verb “have” and “been” is used after subject.
Examples:
      Has he been watching movie for two hours?
      Has the teacher been punishing students since morning?

PRESENT TENSE

PAST TENSE

FUTURE TENSE

Related Posts

Share this page:

0 Comments

Write a Comment

Your email address will not be published.
Required fields are marked *