Present Perfect Tense

Present Perfect Tense

The present perfect tense is used to show an action which happened or completed in past but usually the action which happened or completed at a short time before now (near past) not a very long time before now. Specific time such as two years ago, last week or that day is usually not used in the sentences of in this tense. It means that the present perfect tense shows the action whose time when it happened, is not exactly specified but it sounds to refer to some action that happened or completed in near past.

Rules: Auxiliary verb “has and have” are used in this sentence. We use 3rd form of the verb this sentence.

Structure of Sentence

Positive Sentence
         • Subject + has/have + 3rd form of verb or past participle + subject

If the subject is “He, She, It, singular or proper name” , auxiliary verb “has” is used after subject in sentence.
If subject is “You, We, They or plural” , auxiliary verb “have” is used after subject in sentence.
Examples:
       I have earned a lot of money.
       She has sung a song.

Negative Sentence
        • Subject + has/have + not (Haven't/ hasn't )+ 3rd form of verb or past participle + subject
Note: Have not (Short Contraction) haven't

          Has not (Short Contraction) hasn't
 

Examples:
      I have not / haven't earned a lot of money.
      She has not / hasn't sung a song.

Interrogative Sentences
         • Has/have + Subject + 3rd form of the verb + obj.

Interrogative sentence starts with auxiliary verb. If the subject is “He, She, It, singular or proper name” , the sentence starts with auxiliary verb “has”.
If the subject is “You, They, We or plural”, the sentence starts with auxiliary verb “have”.

Examples:
      Have I earned a lot money?
      Has she sung a song?

Interrogative Negative Sentences 

  • Hasn't/haven't + subject + 3rd form of the verb + object

Examples:

      Haven't I earned a lot money?
      Hasn't she sung a song?

PRESENT TENSE

PAST TENSE

FUTURE TENSE

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